Friday, February 28, 2014

Mark Dixon Presentation

Mark Dixon is an American artist who deals with the recreating of domestic space through scientific presentation.  One of his works that I really appreciated dealt with the archeological findings of the rivers of Venice.  Through his process of his work, he went through the extremely rich soil to find different artifacts that enveloped the history of Venice.  He as an artist is very much into metaphor and creating works that make you see something in a visually different way, and through his archeological finds, he wanted to present the work through the eyes of a mad scientist not of an archeologist.  This relationship through seeing and experimentation is what I love so much about this work in general.  As opposed to just walking in a museum of relics, he visually organized them in a way that metaphorically speaks for itself.  Also, being fond of the past in general, I appreciate how he approaches the display and beauty of the creations of history.  He shows that history in and of itself is the true beauty of art, not of rendering it.
When he came to speak at the Memphis College of Art, I was intrigued but also somewhat disappointed.  Although I appreciated him talking about his projects, I would have liked him to more thoroughly bring about his process of how he uses metaphor to create his visual works.  Although I am still slightly puzzled with his process, I am still in awe and of gratitude that he was able to visit.

Mark Dion Presentation

Mark Dion is an American artist who deals with the recreating of domestic space through scientific presentations.  One of his works that I really appreciated dealt with the archeological findings of the rivers of Venice.  Through his process of this work, he went through the extremely rich soil to find different artifacts that enveloped the history of Venice.  He as an artist is very much into metaphor and creating works that make you see something in a visually different way, and through his archeological finds, he wanted to present the work through the eyes of a mad scientist not of an archeologist.  This relationship through seeing and experimentation is what I love so much about this work in general.  As opposed to just walking in a museum of relics, he visually organizes them in a way that metaphorically speaks for itself.  Also, being fond of the past in general, I appreciate how he approaches the display and beauty of the creations of history. He shows that history in and of itself is the true beauty of art, not of rendering of it.
When he came to speak at the Memphis College of Art, I was intrigued but also somewhat disappointed.  Although I appreciated him talking about each project, I would have liked him to more thoroughly bring about his process of how he uses metaphor to create his visual works.  Although I am still slightly puzzled with his process, I am still in awe and of gratitude that he was able to visit.